Twin Parks Montessori Schools - Preschool Manhattan, Upper West Side, New York City (NYC)

Kathy’s Insights

Insights on the Montessori method and Early Childhood Education from Dr. Kathy Roemer

Kathy’s Insights

Dust in the Wind

Posted on by

I am sitting in my NYC apartment, eyes glued to the news of hurricane Sandy, wondering how each of my family members and Twin Parks Montessori School community members are faring during this unusual storm.  I’ve watched the risk-takers surfing on Long Island  – both NY and NJ locations.  I’ve seen people walking their dogs.  I am thankful that school is closed today and tomorrow.  How would our teachers get to work with MTA closed?  How would our independent toddlers walk down Central Park West and Broadway or West End Avenues to get to school?  The wind would blow them around like a balloon with the string being a link of hands, parent to child.

The wind is howling outside my window.  My door is banging slightly as the pressure in my apartment building changes with the surges of wind.  A friend posted this rendition of “Dust in the Wind“.  I thought it was perfect to calm us as we wait for the eye of the storm.

 

Leave a comment

A Heartfelt Sorrow for our Community

Posted on by

Many families on the Upper West Side hugged their children multiple times on Friday after they learned about the untimely deaths of the children apparently at the hand of their nanny.  A shock wave of horror could be felt across the nation.

I am thankful that the NYC licensing agency provides background checks and requires regular physical exams for every teacher working in our school setting with young children.  Our sincerest sympathy goes out to the family of Lucia and Leo as they try to repair their lives.  Hug your loved ones tonight and count your blessings for your time together.

Leave a comment

Montessori in your home

Posted on by

Children enjoy being a helpful family member.  Children love small hand tools they can use to help with authentic living experiences:  cooking, cleaning, and opportunities to fix mistakes.  When a child walks into his home, he would like to have a low stool to sit on to remove shoes, and a low coat hook to hang his jacket and bag.

Montessori classroom avoid clutter by placing materials and work activities on shelves on trays, in baskets, and in closed bins.  You can avoid clutter at home, too by eliminated toy boxes which are just places to keep belongings in chaos.  Rotate books, toys and art activities to keep learning and playing opportunities fresh and organized.

Children know when they feel hungry or thirsty.  A low shelf in the refrigerator with appropriate, healthy food choices placed on plates and as small pitcher of water allows children to serve themselves independently.  This opportunity is intrinsically rewarding for young children.

“We must give the child an environment that he can use by himself: a little washstand of his own, a bureau with drawers he can open, objects of common use that he can operate, a small bed in which he can “Edison’s Day”.

 

Montessori nursery preschool toddler Upper West Side

A toddler growing up in a Montessori home

 

 

Leave a comment